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20130104
20130112
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
and renamed "sandy hook elementary." we don't know whether this boy was signaling "peace" or "victory," but both seemed about sandy jim axelrod is in newtown for us tonight. bothporter: one police lieutenant here called the new school the safest school in poliica. in america, given all the precautions, kids being met by police officers as they got off the bus and headed into school; i.d. checks on any adult who got anywhere near the place. we sat down with the superintendent of schools, janet robinson, shortly after dismissal. >> thing >> the thing that had been missing at the new sandy hook location were the voices and the laughter of children. >> and that was there today. hookeporter: did you have any parents not able to just let the hand go? >> that's very hard. i... there were parents who wanted to put their child on the bus and just couldn't quite do it. so understandable. >> reporter: over the holidays, volunteers helped to make the new school feel like the old s hool. the students' own desks and chairs were moved. the hope was familiarity would bring comfort. i'm told one paren
for victims of superstorm sandy-- nearly $10 billion to pay for flood insurance claims. house speaker john boehner has promised a vote on another $51 billion later this month. president obama was reelected today. you might have thought that that happened in november but it was today that the house and the senate held a joint session to count the electoral votes from each state. no surprise: mr. obama won with 332 electoral votes to mitt romney's 206. but the president's margin was narrow when you look at the votes cast by individual americans. the popular vote. when you add their totals together, it comes to nearly 130 million votes cast and mr. obama won by about four points. he's the first president to get more than 51% of the vote twice since dwight eisenhower. this is the last thing you want to see when you're taking a flight: the pilot being hauled away by the police. it happened today in minneapolis aboard an american eagle commuter plane bound for new york. the pilot is accused of drinking too much. michelle miller is at laguardia airport for us tonight. michelle? >> reporter: well,
to help victims of superstorm sandy. house speaker john boehner nixed the vote in the last hours of 2012, drawing a firestorm of criticism. it comes up in the house in two parts- the first tomorrow, and the other mid-january. >> the next act will begin a couple of months from now probably in late february, early march, when we hit the debt ceiling and when the automatic spending cuts come into play again and either have to be replaced with other spending cuts, or again, kicked down the road. >> reporter: these are the same issues that snarled congress in the summer of 2011, and again during the fiscal cliff debate. there's little hope for a better outcome this year. president obama has promised not to negotiate with the new congress on raising the debt ceiling, but republicans are ready to use it to force major federal spending reforms and tame the national debt. right now, the u.s. owes $16 trillion, but some calculate our total liabilities much higher. and as congress jumps from small deal to small deal as they have been, analysts worry big problems are just getting bigger. >> $60 tril
to stay. >> pelley: but jersey had an answer for sandy captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> pelley: good evening. junior seau was one of the fiercest linebackers in the nfl. he had nearly 2,000 tackles on his way to 12 pro bowls and a super bowl. but retirement was even more punishing. saw au had emotional problems late in life that ended in suicide. and today researchers say that they found that seau who was only 43 years old was suffering from degenerative brain disease as the result of his career in america's favorite game. the findings add to a growing body of evidence that has the attention of players, parents and the nfl. seth doa ne has the seau report. >> reporter: junior seau was a star nfl linebacker for 20 years. last may, two years after retiring, he shot himself. this was his mother louisa. >> but i pray to god, please, take me! take me, leave my son! but it's too late, too late. >> reporter: seau's family donated his brain for analysis because they suspected his suicide was linked to head injuries suffered on the field. today
late than never. 11 weeks after hurricane sandy hit the east coast, congress finally signs off on $9 billion in federal aid for storm victims. and the outlook for o.j. florida's orange juice industry has seen some good weather, but a citrus disease threatens to take juice prices higher. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> tom: steady as she goes, that's the latest word on the u.s. job mark$lk s companies kept up a consistent pace of hiring last month. employers added 155,000 new jobs to their payrolls in december. that was slightly less than expected, but close to the amount added in november. the nation's unemployment rate also held steady at 7.8% and the job gains last month were spread throughout the economy. still, there is little optimism hiring will gain much momentum this year. suzanne pratt has the story. >> reporter: 153,000-- that's the average number of jobs the economy created every month of last year. while it's not an awful, it's not impressive, either. and, for the millions of americans still out of work, the job market remains downright depressing. >> 150,
for several of the sandy hook children. he agrees something has to be done, but he says lawmakers can't just focus on guns; they must focus on treatment of mental illness and school safety. >> it's time to put away those political fights and try to reach a consensus on what we can do that will actually make our society safer. >> reporter: state senator mckinney told us he does expect new gun control laws in connecticut this year. and, scott, the parents of sandy hook victims, they have some ideas of their own that will be announced on monday. >> pelley: michelle, thank you. we learned today that president obama will nominate his chief of staff, jack lew, to be the new secretary of the treasury. he will be a key player in the coming battles over the budget and raising the federal debt limit. lew previously served as budget director, and he was an executive with the banking giant citigroup. now, any idea what this is? you could be seeing a lot of it. it is jack lew's signature which would appear on the bills in your pocket just like that unless he takes a penmanship lesson from tim geithner, w
lovers meet. in one community devastated by sandy, the boardwalk was the very heart of the town. elaine quijano now on what's being done to get it beating again. >> you want cheese on it? >> cheeseburger. >> reporter: jimmy kamaris has opened his restaurant, jimmy's place, in the jersey shore town of belmar every weekday morning since hurricane sandy hit 10 weeks ago. did you think about walking away? >> i sure did. i really did. i was thinking about, you know, just closing up shop, taking my losses and moving on. but something told me to stay. we're here to help you out. >> god bless you. >> reporter: for three weeks he gave away food for free. with power out and much of the town under water, his restaurant powered by a generator was the only place to get a hot meal. >> it was scary. it was scary and nerve-racking to say the least. i think i fed off the people i was feeding. i kind of fed off of them because they were so appreciative. i got strength from them, you know, to hang on. >> reporter: kamaris weathered through, and now jimmy's p
,700 homes were damaged or destroyed. and of course, in october, super storm sandy brought a record storm surge to the new york and new jersey coast lines. 131 people were killed. 650,000 homes were damaged or destroyed. more than eight million homes and businesses lost power, some of them for weeks. so 2012 is in the record books. but the devastating drought continues. it covers 61% of the continental u.s. the worst of it you see right there in darkest red. texas officials today had bad news for farmers who badly need water. anna werner has their story. >> what you see now, when it comes out of here, it will be white. >> reporter: the operationpe managed by harold ross dries the rice harvested by farmers around eagle lake, texas. b rice has been grown here since the 1800s, but few years have been as dry as the last two. >> we've been in business since 1947. i've never seen anything like this.ever i've never seen a point where we didn't have water enough to plant rice. >> reporter: rainfall in texas is more than 16 inches below normal. rice production statewide has dropped 37%. bu but the
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)